The largest organ of the human body, it serves as a protective barrier from germs, assists in regulating our body temperature and regulates hydration. It is also the target of many beauty advertisements and products. Whether through the application of creams, make-up or tattoos, skin and the way it's presented are integral parts of the human aesthetic. 

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Photographer and artist Juuke Schoorl was interested in exploring skin as its own medium for art. By taking advantage of its unique properties, Schoorl creates visceral images that have us reconsidering our "biological upholstery." 

Schoorl says of her work, "With my project ‘Rek’ (‘Stretch’ in Dutch) I focused on exploring the aesthetic possibilities of the human skin. I was inspired by the materiality of the human skin and how it reacts to external stimuli. The adaptability of this curious stretchable material amazed me and I realized it is much more malleable than we usually notice or realize."

Using commonly available materials like nylon string, Schoorl is able to manipulate the natural drape of skin. The ridges formed down this model's back have us questioning what we typically consider to be beautiful about the female form.

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Schoorl says of her work, "As an artist the challenge for me is to translate the normal things around us into something visually new and exciting. By enhancing or enlarging things that I find interesting, but others sometimes hardly notice, I hope to challenge others peoples perspectives on the world. "

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By manipulating the skin, Schoorl is able to make what initially looks like injuries into beautiful textures. 

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"I like to challenge the physical abilities of my subjects. Especially logical or physical principles found in nature or in technological devices I find really exciting. Besides that I'm generally fascinated by the malleability of the human body and I often like to mix the two. At the moment I'm interested in creating my own physical tools to create filmic experiments or effects, similar to what I did in Liquid Skin."

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"During the initial experimental stages I intuitively try-out various techniques and processes so I never know beforehand what the outcome of the final shoot will be. "

A combination of tape and nylon string was used to give this model ridges reminiscent of spikes you might find on a lizard's neck. The juxtaposition of the model's graceful pose with an animal often linked to our primitive selves creates a duality that asks viewers to reconsider what we know of ourselves. 

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