Like something out of a bad nightmare, webs filled with caterpillar-like worms took over portions of Uppsala University in Sweden.

Sven Sandberg documented the invasion in a set of popular photographs. In the photographs, web worms, which are gypsy moth in their larval state, are everywhere. 
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The insects and their webs took up residence on trees, buildings and even bicycles.

According to Crooked Brains, web worm population booms are common, occurring every four to five years. When they happen, many of the worms die because of a lack of food, so people don’t actually have to deal with millions of adult gypsy moths. 

Typically, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, gypsy moths prefer hardwood trees. The destroy one million acres of forest a year in the United States. 

They hide in the tree in flaps of bark and under branches, so that predators such as mice and beetles won’t eat them. During daylight hours, they crawl down the trunk of the tree to rest. The moths eat the host tree’s foliage until it is stripped, then they go in search of new food sources.

The larvae typically become adult gypsy moths between June and July. To discourage gypsy moths, the department of agriculture suggests people diversify the type of trees and plants they have on their property, get rid of objects such as flaps of bark, dead tree branches, dead trees, boxes, cans and old tires outside of the home and destroy any egg masses that they find.

When an infestation occurs, like a Uppsala’s campus, the department of agriculture recommends the use of microbial or chemical pesticides.  

The Imgur post photos are shown below: 

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