Have you ever been out shopping or looking around online for a gift and come across something that you really liked but didn’t want to spend the price that was asked? An uncle who goes by the screenname of rionled on Imgur had just this experience. He came across a sandbox while perusing the Web and thought his nephew would enjoy it. Rather than purchase the item, though, he decided he would build the item himself.
Advertisement
The sandbox turned out beautifully; the nephew was thrilled; and rionled decided to share with everyone how to create a really cool way to have a sandbox in the yard without it looking like a sandbox. We’re going to share the process with you. 


Uploading...
rionled

According to rionled, the tools you will need are a drop saw, a drill, and a spray gun. If you don’t have these, don’t despair. A hand saw, a paint brush, and a screw driver will also work. Having someone to lend a hand will be helpful as you are going to be flipping the box over a number of times throughout the building process.   

Once you have your tools, you will need some supplies. Here is the list: two 2 inch x 6 inch x 8 feet (2 x 6) boards, one 2 inch x 4 inch x 8 feet (2 x 4) boards,  four decking boards (2 inch x 6 inch x 10 feet), screws (75 mm & 45 mm), 8 hinges, 4 handles, and outdoor stain. Now that you are armed with your supplies and tools, you are ready to tackle the job.      

Using the two 2 x 6 boards for the base, cut one board into two pieces that are 33 inches and 49 inches. Do the same with the other board. Using two 70 mm screws, attach the 49 inch boards to the 33 inch boards, forming a rectangle as seen below. Make sure the 33 inch boards are to the inside of the 49 inch boards.  

Uploading...

Let's move on to the lid. You'll be using the decking boards for this part. Each piece for the lid should be 36 inches in length, but before making the first cut, place a piece of decking timber on the base and double check to make sure that it will be a perfect fit. Once you've double checked, cut 12 pieces total. 

Uploading...

With all 12 pieces cut, you can start putting the lid for the sandbox together. Attach two pieces of decking timber to each end of the sandbox using the 75 mm screws, leaving no gap between the pieces. Without attaching the piece, place the third lid piece at each end. Leave a one-quarter inch gap between the second and third piece of decking timber on each side of the box. This is where you will attach the hinges for the seats. Attach two hinges on the top side to the second and third piece of decking timber. Make sure that the hinges can open 180 degrees.    

Uploading...

Cut four lengths of 2 x 4 board eight inches long (the length of the third and fourth lid pieces). Pre-drill two holes in the decking timber 2.25 inches from each end of pieces three and four (four holes in each board total). After the holes are drilled, take one of the 8-inch 2 x 4 pieces and turn it on its two-inch side. Hold it in place underneath the holes you just drilled. The board should be against the inside edge of the frame and cover the third and fourth lid pieces. Drill the 2 x 4 into place from the top side as you hold it underneath.   

Now, flip the sandbox over. Leave another one-quarter inch gap between the fourth and fifth lid pieces. Screw two hinges on each side from the inside of the sandbox, making sure that they can open at least 90 degrees. These are what will form the backs to the seats. The sandbox needs to be flipped right-side up now. Cut four 15-inch lengths of 2  x 4.  Lay the sixth, and final lid pieces on the frame. Place the 2 x 4 pieces four-tenths of an inch back from the front edge of each of the sixth pieces. Make certain that they are flush with the sides of the sandbox. (See the picture below.) Screw the 2 x 4’s into the fifth and sixth lid pieces, making sure that they have plenty of strength to support little kids leaning on them. Make sure these 2 x 4’s are not attached to any other pieces, or the lid will not open and fold the way it should. 


Uploading...

For the finishing touches, tape the hinges to keep them free from stain and apply your stain. An outdoor stain would be best as this is meant to be outdoors in the weather. Once the stain is dry, attach the handles, two on each side. Your sandbox is ready to be moved to its final resting place, filled and played with. 

The next time you spot a really neat item with a price you don’t want to pay, remember what rionled did and see if you can build it yourself. Maybe you’ll have a neat “do-it-yourself” article to share just like he does. Plus, the satisfaction that comes from making something with your hands just can’t be beat! 

Uploading...