Under this nondescript house is a Cold War-era bunker. But if you are imagining a single room with cement walls and cans of beans, think again. This bunker is more luxurious than many homes. 

From the surface, you will see a fairly simple home. It's spacious, but unimpressive. Other than the four-car garage and fountain, the two-story, two-bedroom house doesn't stand out against similarly sized Las Vegas homes. 

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Once inside, you notice stairs leading downward. But instead of a basement, there is an entirely different house. Unlike most bunkers that are designed to meet bare emergency needs, this one leaves out no luxury. 
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Twenty five feet below the surface, entrepreneur and underground-living enthusiast Girard B. Henderson built a grand 6,000-square-foot, two-bedroom, three-bathroom hideaway home in 1978 -- his second luxury bunker, according to the Henderson Family Tree. He also formed Underground World Homes and presented at the New York World's Fair in 1964 and 1965. "The company was inspired in part by Henderson’s belief that the Cold War would not end as it did — with a David Hasselhoff concert and Mikhail Gorbachev tearing down that wall — but with the last remnants of humanity hunkered down in underground bunkers," reports The Las Vegas Review-Journal

Still, Henderson did not seem to believe that underground living need sacrifice the finer pleasures of life. 

The spacious living room has a fireplace, and the master bedroom has a full Jacuzzi. 

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In addition to a full-size kitchen, there is also a bar for entertaining. Rather than retreating to the underground shelter during a nuclear fallout, Henderson and his wife used the shelter as their main abode. The house at the surface level was for the caretaker, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. 

The perfectly preserved pink kitchen and original appliances give the unique home an added vintage appeal. 

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The house even has large windows throughout to let in light. 

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Yes, that's right. The underground house has windows. The bunker is not just the house but also an entire faux exterior area and guest house spanning a total of more than 15,000 square feet. "The underground refuge seems designed to stave off boredom and claustrophobia," writes Eli Segall for Vegas Inc

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False trees, artificial grass and murals surround the house, giving the illusion of normal life above ground. The lights are programmed to mimic daylight, dusk and nightfall at the command of a button. 

Given the luxury of the interior, guests shouldn't be surprised that the "exterior" also has every imaginable comfort. 

Lounge in the heated pool, or take a stroll along the cliffs. 

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A beautiful summer day would be perfect for a barbecue, or for practicing your putting. 

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After Henderson and his wife passed, the home was given to a distant relative, then turned over to the bank, reports the Las Vegas Review-Journal. In 2012, Seaway Bank and Trust Co. asked for $1.7 million, eventually selling the property to a little-known nonprofit group, Society for the Preservation of Near Extinct Species, in March 2014 for a mere $1.15 million, reports Vegas Inc

Winston King of Kingly Properties, who brokered the deal, gives a tour of the underground bunker in the video below. He closes the video saying, "It's a bargain at $1.7 [million]. Especially for someone who likes a reclusive, eccentric, movie-star hide-away."